All Aboard! The Golden Age of Travel Returns with Vuitton, Valextra and More

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012 Runway Show at Paris Fashion Week

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012 Runway Show at Paris Fashion Week

When Marc Jacobs built a life-sized train for his Louis Vuitton presentation during Paris Fashion Week, the entire crowd — online and in-person — let out a collective gasp. Was the world finally sick of reading about recessions, depressions and the like? Jacobs believed that the world was ready for real luxury again, and if the critical reception to the collection is anything to go by, he was right. The world seems primed to embrace a time where optimism reigned supreme and every day is the beginning of an adventure. We’ve gathered up the best of the season’s vintage-inspired luggage, from the upper echelons of luxury to a brand that’s inspired by the Orient Express mystique, for those planning a summer getaway in high style.

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012

Louis Vuitton Fall 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not only did Jacobs construct an entire train, he had each model emerge accompanied by a porter carrying handfuls and armloads of bags. According to reports from the models waiting within, every detail inside was finished as if the train were truly going to embark on a transcontinental sojourn. Vuitton’s legacy started with the jet set, after all. From hatboxes in exotic skins to LV-monogrammed carryalls and smaller luggage pieces, the models walked with quiet confidence as their porters carried their luggage behind them. Though nobody knows just yet which pieces will be put into production and be sent to Vuitton stores, we can’t wait to see which of these luxe carriers will make an appearance during fashion week.

Salvatore Ferragamo Pre-Fall 2012

Salvatore Ferragamo Pre-Fall 2012

Not to be outdone, Salvatore Ferragamo’s Massimiliano Giornetti showed a different kind of world traveler in his pre-fall collection. Channeling the likes of Bianca Jagger and her coterie of jet set gypsies and vagabonds, models sported luggage-inspired pieces done up in exotic skins like ostrich, python and crocodile dyed in deep saturated hues.

While the environs — a private room in a train station once reserved strictly for royalty — were less showy than Jacob’s presentation at Vuitton, the collection was no less layered and luxe. From the capes and long leather gloves to cobblestone-ready flats, everything about the looks said seasoned traveler shot through with eccentricity — thanks to the floppy hats and Ferragamo-logo belt buckles and sunglasses. With the house of Ferragamo catering to its extremely loyal clientele and looking to give its brand a jolt of youth, it struck a perfect balance.

Valextra Luggage

Valextra Luggage

Looking at pieces from luxe luggage makers Valextra, you’d think the pieces were being made by a collective of sleek Swedes. In reality, the clean lines, space-age precision and hyper-modern sensibility (not to mention the lack of any discernable logos) come from a family run Italian company that dates back to 1937.

Since it began, Valextra has outfitted chic travelers on transcontinental train rides and yacht cruises around the Riviera. Today, the brand expanded their brand to include handbags and tech accessories (including a collab with Katlie Holmes’ label Holmes & Yang) and have become a go-to brand for celebs like Victoria Beckham — before she had her own eponymous line of luxe bags, of course. The prices make Louis Vuitton pieces look like near bargains, but the brand justifies its positioning in the luxury market by sources the world’s best leather and including details like snap-locks on their zippers and lots of interior pockets. In addition to their full line, Valextra has fostered a popular bespoke service that can customize everything from briefcases with special compartments to wrangle cords to steamer trunks for couture gowns.

Globe-Trotter Luggage

Globe-Trotter Luggage

North of the continent, Brit staple Globe-Trotter has been crafting luggage since 1897 in Hertfordshire. Their signature isn’t leather or monogrammed canvas. Instead, they’ve been using vulcanized fiberboard, which was developed for the British miliary in the 1850s. Made of layers of bonded paper, it’s lightweight and durable. The corner pieces alone take five days to create and one Globe-Trotter carpenter is responsible for each frame is from beginning to end. The combination of style and practicality also caught the eye of J. Crew, which carries a special edition canary-yellow Globe-Trotter set in their New York liquor store location.

The brand’s old-world style hasn’t changed since they were established, but they have added modern conveniences such as wheels and pull handles (discreetly, of course). And since the British love a hometown hero, Liberty declared Globe-Trotter a national treasure and invited the brand to be part of a special exhibition showcasing the best of English ingenuity and innovation.

Steamline Stylist Series Luggage

Steamline Stylist Series Luggage

If you want to spend your cash on your actual airplane ticket and not the luggage you’ll be checking, click onto the SteamLine Luggage Web page. The Irish brand takes all of the traditional old-world luggage looks and delivers it to you at a reasonable price.

Available in four styles and an array of colors, StreamLine’s luggage comes in two sizes (one carry-on and the other stow-away sized) and various materials, including linen, leathers and more. Each series is inspired by a different global city. The Stylist (pictured) recalls the street style of Paris with bright colors and patterned straps while the luxe Diplomat line is perfect for the dignitaries that visit Geneva, Switzerland. With trolley wheels, sturdy handles and bright flashes of color, nobody has to know that your SteamLine luggage isn’t from a century-old heritage brand.

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Author:Christopher Luu for Fashion Trends Daily

Christopher Luu is a Fashion Trends Daily Senior Writer and Menswear Editor.